Tyre for POLO CROSS

Tyre Polo Cross

cross-polo

 

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In June 2010, Volkswagen presented the 2011 edition of the CrossPolo, the fourth member of the small car’s family. The 2011 edition will be available in petrol and three diesel engines, all Euro 5 compliant.[23]

Volkswagen, the German automaker, is working on a small SUV for developing nations including India and Brazil, which could be based on either the MQB platform or PQ25 platform, expected to be launched in 2016.[24]

As of 2014, there have been five separate generations of the Polo, usually identified by a “Series” or “Mark” number.[1]

Some generations were facelifted mid way through production, with the updated versions known unofficially by an addition of the letter F to the mark number, e.g. Mark IIF. Some press and enthusiasts consider the facelifts to be separate models and hence have used the unofficial designations Polo Mark 1 to Mark 7 for previous generations.[2] Each model of Polo is also identified by a two or three character Volkswagen Group Typ number. Official VW Polo history describes Mark I to Mark IV using either Roman numerals[1] or Arabic numerals, with facelifted variants known as “Phase II” models.[3]

The body style has been varied through the life of the car, originally as a hatchback which derived from the Audi 50.[2] A saloon version was marketed as theVolkswagen Derby.

Volkswagen vehicles built off different platforms have carried the Polo name plate. For example the Volkswagen Polo Playa hatchback sold in Southern Africa in the late 1990s was a rebadged SEAT Ibiza which has a different body shell from the Mark III Polo sold in Europe at the same time. The current saloon is only available in China, Latin America and South Africa and other Southern Africa countries.

Starting in 1982, Volkswagen sold the Polo in Japan initially through an agreement with Japanese dealership Yanase that specializes in European and North American vehicles. Of all Volkswagens imported into Japan, only the Polo and the Golf, until 1997, complied with Japanese Government dimension regulations until the introduction of the VW Up! in 2012.

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